Did You Know? What Makes Your Drink a Bourbon, Scotch, Whiskey Or Rye?

Sales of distilled spirits got through to approximately $72 billion last year. Potential growth in the whiskey segment increased the demand for top-notch alcohol brands. These whiskeys were particularly popular with American consumers, with luxury Bourbon, Scotch, Canadian, and Irish whiskeys all recording double-digit growth.

Nearly every country is into whiskey production nowadays. It is no longer limited to Scottish and Irish thing abroad.

Scotland is the world's dominant producer of malt whiskey. It has more than 80 distilleries which are currently in function. Millions of litres of whiskey are produced in Scotland every year. Approximately 2,70,000 thousand litres of whiskey was produced in 2015 in Scotland alone.

USA grabs the second place in whiskey production with approximately 37 million cases of whiskey each year. It has mainly two specialities- Jack Daniels and Jim Beam.

Canada produces nearly 22 million cases of whisky, thus holding a third place in the whisky production. It has chiefly 3 prime whiskeys- Crown Royal, Black Velvet and Canadian Club.

Other countries include Ireland, Japan and India which also a significant place in the production of whiskey around the world.

Production and highly driven by consumption and demand. According to a recent report, India is the biggest consumer of whisky drinking about 1.5 billion litres.

Where as Americans are drinking roughly 462 million liters of whiskey. Japan comes next with a consumption of 140 million liters.

Of Course, the primary factor behind India taking a first spot is the huge population. According to the per capita consumption, India holds a back seat with very scanty consumption of whisky.

With these figures, we know how much we love our drink but there’s a lot to be discovered still. Amazingly, most of us have little or no idea about ‘What is that which makes our drink a Whiskey, Bourbon, Scotch or Rye?’

See this beautiful infographic below and you’ll know the difference -

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